Sign up for our newsletter to get the latest news and specials!


Now with select Items
receive a free gift!
A free small can of Inulation.

Limit 1 can per order! Does not apply to orders including buy 3 get 1 free items.

With your smartphone or tablet scan this QR code and like our facebook store page and get 10% off all items purchased through that store.

QRCode
    





Home > Information Depot > About Digestive Enzymes

ENZYME INFORMATION DEPOT

Do you know anyone who suffers from these?

  • Heartburn
  • Constipation
  • Bloating
  • Chronic Illness
  • Diverticulitis
  • Gas
  • Food Allergies
  • Sensitive Stomach
  • Lactose Intolerance
  • Celiac Disease
  • Crohn's Disease

REASONS TO USE ENZYMES, PREBIOTICS AND PROBIOTICS

ENZYME INFORMATION DEPOT

(Click on YouTube Graphics Below To Watch)

Use Back Arrow To Return Here 

Video on Enzymes to Lose Weight

 Video on Digestive Enzymes For Your Health
 Video on Crohn's Disease
 Video on Diverticulitis
Video on Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
Video on Celiac Disease 

Celiac disease
occurs when the body reacts abnormally to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and possibly oats. When someone with celiac disease eats foods containing gluten, that person's immune system causes an inflammatory response in the small intestine, which damages the tissues and results in impaired ability to absorb nutrients from foods. The inflammation and malabsorption create wide-ranging problems in many systems of the body. Since the body's own immune system causes the damage, celiac disease is classified as an "autoimmune" disorder.


Crohn's disease involves inflammation of the intestine, especially the small intestine. Inflammation refers to swelling, redness, and loss of normal function. There is evidence that the inflammation is caused by various products of the immune system that attack the body itself instead of helpfully attacking a foreign invader (a virus or bacteria, for example). The inflammation of Crohn's disease most commonly affects the last part of the ileum (a section of the small intestine), and often includes the large intestine (the colon). However, inflammation may also occur in other areas of the gastrointestinal tract, affecting the mouth, esophagus, or stomach. Crohn's disease differs from ulcerative colitis, the other major type of IBD, in two important ways:

1. The inflammation of Crohn's disease may be discontinuous, meaning that areas of involvement in the intestine may be separated by normal, unaffected segments of intestine. The affected areas are called "regional enteritis," while the normal areas are called "skip areas."

2. The inflammation of Crohn's disease affects all the layers of the intestinal wall, while ulcerative colitis affects only the lining of the intestine.

For more information go to http://www.answers.com/crohns%20disease

Diverticulitis refers to the development of inflammation and infection in one or more diverticula. Diverticula are outpouchings or bulges which occur when the inner, lining layer of the large intestine (colon) bulges out (herniated) through the outer, muscular layer. The presence of diverticula indicates a condition called diverticulosis.

Diverticula tend to occur most frequently in the last segment of the large intestine, the sigmoid colon. They occur with decreasing frequency as an examination moves toward the beginning of the large intestine. The chance of developing diverticula increases with age, so that by the age of 50, about 20�50% of all people will have some diverticula. By the age of 90, virtually everyone will have developed some diverticula. Most diverticula measure 3�30 mm in diameter. Larger diverticula, termed giant diverticula, are quite infrequent, but may measure as large as 15 cm in diameter.
For more information go to http://www.answers.com/Diverticulitis%20

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common intestinal condition characterized by abdominal pain and cramps; changes in bowel movements (diarrhea, constipation, or both); gassiness; bloating; nausea; and other symptoms. There is no cure for IBS. Much about the condition remains unknown or poorly understood; however, dietary changes, drugs, and psychological treatment are often able to eliminate or substantially reduce its symptoms.

IBS is the name people use today for a condition that was once called - among other things - colitis, mucous colitis, spastic colon, nervous colon, spastic bowel, and functional bowel disorder. Some of these names reflected the now-outdated belief that IBS is a purely psychological disorder, a product of the patient's imagination. Although modern medicine recognizes that stress can trigger IBS attacks, medical specialists agree that IBS is a genuine physical disorder - or group of disorders - with specific identifiable characteristics.

No one knows for sure how many Americans suffer from IBS. Surveys indicate a range of 10-20%, with perhaps as many as 30% of Americans experiencing IBS at some point in their lives. IBS normally makes its first appearance during young adulthood, and in half of all cases symptoms begin before age 35. Women with IBS outnumber men by two to one, for reasons that are not yet understood. IBS is responsible for more time lost from work and school than any medical problem other than the common cold. It accounts for a substantial proportion of the patients seen by specialists in diseases of the digestive system (gastroenterologists). Yet only half - possibly as few as 15% - of IBS sufferers ever consult a doctor.

For more information go to http://www.answers.com/irritable%20bowel%20syndrome

DISCLAIMER: Information on this website is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. You should not use the information contained herein for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication. You should read all product packaging carefully. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provider. The statements on this website have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration. The statements on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Pregnant and lactating women should always consult their health care professional before using any dietary supplement. The information contained on this website was derived from medical, nutritional, and media publication.
Copyright ©  NWB-The Guardians. All Rights Reserved.
Built with Volusion